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Knows the basics about brain injuries

| Oct 5, 2018 | Personal Injury

Most Kentucky residents may not give brain injuries much thought until they or a person they love experiences one. Brain injuries can have serious ramifications for a person’s health and it is important for people to know the basic information about this kind of wound.

People may not realize that there is more than one kind of brain injury. The Brain Injury Association of America says these types are non-traumatic and traumatic brain injuries. A non-traumatic injury is typically caused by something that happens inside a person’s head, such as a seizure or stroke. When people incur the traumatic form of this wound, this is usually because some kind of outside force has affected their head. This outside force might be a ball if someone is injured while playing sports, or a steering wheel or headrest if someone gets into a car accident. Motor vehicle collisions and sports are only two of the ways someone might incur a traumatic brain injury. People might also receive this wound after slipping and falling.

After they incur a brain injury, people might experience numerous symptoms. According to the Mayo Clinic, some people may feel anxious or find that their mood keeps changing. Other people might experience ringing in their ears or have blurry vision. Additionally, some people may lose consciousness immediately after they experience the trauma to their head. It is important to remember that symptoms sometimes may not appear for a few days.

It is a good idea for people to visit a doctor after they experience a blow to the head. This allows a physician to diagnose the injury so people can begin to receive the care they need. Seeing a doctor is especially important if people experience symptoms of a brain injury.